10 Questions You Need to Be Asking Your Team – About You

If you are like me, you are constantly looking around for the best next move to grow as a leader.

I frequently ask why, when, what, and how while looking to enhance who I am as a leader, how my team can improve, and ensure the why is staying at the center of what we do as a team.

I work hard to create a healthy environment with my team that gives everyone permission to provide feedback. From time to time, I will “formally” sit down and invite feedback with specific questions. I recently sat down with one of my employees and asked them 10 specific questions that invited helpful feedback. I walked away encouraged and challenged of where I can improve. In fact, I will sit down with another employee tomorrow and ask the same 10 questions.

“Don’t ask for feedback. Invite it.”
— Claire Lew, CEO, Know Your Company

What if the best next move for you was simply sitting down with your employee(s) and inviting feedback? Try it.

1. Have I ever said or done anything that robbed you of your passion and energy?

2. Is there anything I do that gets in the way of your ability or your willingness to do your job?

3. Do you feel like you have the latitude you need to make decisions that are important to your role?

4. Do you receive encouragement from me that inspires you?

5. Do you ever feel like your voice is not heard or your opinion is not valued?

6. What can I do to help make (insert your organization) the best place you’ve ever worked?

7. What three things do you wish I would continue to do, do more, or stop doing?

8. What’s it like to be on the other side of me:
• In work situations?
• Personally?

9. What could I do personally to help you be more successful?

10.What is my blind spot?

“Your best next move both personally and professionally could come by asking your employee(s) about you. Think of it as getting curious about being on the other side of you.”


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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jason Young

Jason Young

I love growing leaders, building volunteer teams, designing guest experiences and being strategic about how they intersect. I am the Director of Guest Services for North Point Ministries. You can also find me helping organizations and churches. I have worked with Ford, LifeChurch.tv, LifeWay, Growing Leaders, PossibleNOW, The Fellowship, WinShape, Loganville Christian Academy, First Baptist Church Woodstock, Chick-fil-A, Catalyst and others. I have fun reading, watching movies, hiking, and visiting Disney World. I live in Atlanta, GA.

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In this era, we have the opportunity of professional church staff today who utilize their gifting to shape the image and atmosphere of the church organization. But the 100% real impact on the church visitors is genuine evidence of changed lives by the gospel and the active growing discipleship (just as it was in the first century church). One demonstration is financially rich believers ministering equally together with poor believers (how odd, and incredibly miraculous; all humble and bow at the foot of the cross.). It is the awesome contrast of church members vocations, race, gender, age, maturity, gifting, humility that demonstrates to visitors "there is a Spirit in the place". That first-time guest list of 10 are "physical excuses", not spiritual excuses. Those don't tell the story. The condition of facilities and publicly greeting people have zero to do with it. The power of God in and through believers lives dedicated to impact other people with their relationship bridge-building of acceptance of the lost around them. Empowered believers are infectious, loving, helpful, giving, self-less, dynamic, compelling, bold, Christ-filled. As I have been in many church settings domestically and internationally, the facilities can be poor, and yet the fellowship can still be rich. We need to operate with first church humility. People come to Christ on His terms, not on our human abilities of hospitality. A huge catastrophe in a community, disaster relief brings lots of people into churches – many come to the church in those terrible conditions no matter the physical condition of the local church. Off the condition of facility, and onto the condition of God's people (living stones).... and everything else will grow.... and the other physical issues will be corrected by the staff.
 
— Russ Wright
 
"While I understand the intent behind this phrase" Expound please. What do you understand to be the intent behind that phrase?
 
— Ken
 
Thank you for this article! I'm the pastor of a small church. My gifting is in teaching and we are known for aiding Christians in becoming Biblically literate. Visitor's often comment on God's presence being very real in our services. But we just don't seem to be growing. I have some soul-searching, etc. to do and this article provides some solid ground from which to proceed. Thank you again.
 
— Jonathan Schultheis
 

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