8 Strategic Changes You Must Consider When Changing Culture

Since the world around us is constantly changing, the inability to change with it can have huge, negative consequences.

Everyone knows this and yet many organizations – even those full of very smart people – often find it almost impossible to change.

Geoffrey James has written a manifesto that explains the source of the difficulty and provides a set of steps that can help an organization move from what might be called “20th Century” thinking to “21st Century” thinking.

That type of thinking involves asking some tough questions which lead to strategic changes you must consider when changing culture.

  1. What is business all about?
  2. What is a corporation all about?
  3. What is management all about?
  4. What role do employees play?
  5. What really motivates people?
  6. What is the nature of change?
  7. What’s the role of technology?
  8. What is the essential nature of work?

Also covered in this manifesto:

  • 8 Strategic Changes You Must Consider When Changing Culture
  • How to Change an Organizational Culture
  • 26 Strategies that Match Action to Belief

>> Download James’ manifesto here

8StrategicChanges

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

VRcurator

Bob Adams is Auxano's Vision Room Curator. His background includes over 23 years as an associate/executive pastor as well as 8 years as the Lead Consultant for a church design build company.

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Recent Comments
If someone wants entertainment they're going to the wrong place. Church is not a place for entertainment...or in my opinion a barrage of coffee and donuts. Why are churches today bringing the world INTO them? Then there's the thing with children...age appropriate??? These little guys can pick stuff up in service. Besides Jesus said Suffer little children, and forbid them not, to come unto me: for of such is the kingdom of heaven. Mt. 19:14.
 
— Laurie
 
I love the intentionality here as well as the challenge to look at the data. That's missing so many times. I would like to offer a contrarian's take. Church members and regular attenders have so many ways to get information: Announcements, bulletins, social channels, relationships, and email being among the options. But brand new people are likely going to check out the website and that's it. It might be wiser for churches with limited time and resources to focus their website almost exclusively to guests. This group of people isn't looking for a calendar of events but wants to know about regular programs. They probably aren't interested in watching all of the messages but instead may want to preview one of the services. For the times we need church members to go to websites (sign up for camp, join a group, etc), we're probably better off designing and promoting a specific page rather than cluttering up the homepage.
 
— Michael Lukaszewski (@mlukaszewski)
 
A great question! Unfortunately, the Church Unique Kit is no longer available in print form. We are working on revising it and updating it into an online experience, but that project is at least six months out. An alternative is to come to an upcoming certification class. There is one May 15-18 in Houston, and October 23-26 in Atlanta.
 
— VRcurator
 

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