ABOUT GREG GIBBS

Greg Gibbs
Greg Gibbs was raised in the Philadelphia area but has set down roots in the suburbs of Detroit.  As the son of an IBM executive, his instincts for leadership were shaped early.  And, the commitment and involvement of his family in church leadership provided exposure to that environment as well.  He studied Organizational Communication as an undergrad and holds a master's degree in Theology. After a dozen years of leadership in churches both on the west coast and in Michigan, Greg turned his attention to consulting and has spent years traveling the country working with church leaders of all denominations, sizes, and approaches. Greg is both practitioner and consultant. He is the Director of Organizational Advancement for Kensington Church - his home church and one of the largest in the United States. Kensington is a multi-site church with eight campuses, and has helped fund and coach over 50 church plants around the country.  Greg’s tenure at Kensington includes the spear-heading of two $20M capital campaigns at Kensington, as well as developing the Leadership Development program. After 15 years of strategic consulting and having helped raise over $150M for various churches, Greg joined the Auxano team in 2016 as a Lead Navigator. Greg focuses his attention on counseling leaders regarding Clarity of Vision and Building a Generosity Culture in the church. He conducts the God Dreams Retreat, the Vision Frame Process, and other facilitated coaching as needed. Greg has been married to Andrea for 27 years and they have four children, two dogs, and like to roast their own coffee with beans they purchase at the Eastern Market in downtown Detroit.

Three Non-Negotiables for Raising Funds for the Church

With solid strategy and approach and these three non-negotiable concepts, increased funding can be on the way to your church.

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Recent Comments
What happens when u dont have a meeting place any more. And u was forced out because the buliding wasnt available any more.
 
— Debra
 
If someone wants entertainment they're going to the wrong place. Church is not a place for entertainment...or in my opinion a barrage of coffee and donuts. Why are churches today bringing the world INTO them? Then there's the thing with children...age appropriate??? These little guys can pick stuff up in service. Besides Jesus said Suffer little children, and forbid them not, to come unto me: for of such is the kingdom of heaven. Mt. 19:14.
 
— Laurie
 
I love the intentionality here as well as the challenge to look at the data. That's missing so many times. I would like to offer a contrarian's take. Church members and regular attenders have so many ways to get information: Announcements, bulletins, social channels, relationships, and email being among the options. But brand new people are likely going to check out the website and that's it. It might be wiser for churches with limited time and resources to focus their website almost exclusively to guests. This group of people isn't looking for a calendar of events but wants to know about regular programs. They probably aren't interested in watching all of the messages but instead may want to preview one of the services. For the times we need church members to go to websites (sign up for camp, join a group, etc), we're probably better off designing and promoting a specific page rather than cluttering up the homepage.
 
— Michael Lukaszewski (@mlukaszewski)
 

Clarity Process

Three effective ways to start moving toward clarity right now.