Church Communication Hero: Martin Luther King, Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. is perhaps the greatest champion for social change in 20th century America. He was also a Baptist minister.

He led a congregation, like many of you.

He sat through church business meetings, like many of you.

He worked to share the story of the gospel with his community, like many of you.

It’s somewhat revisionist and a little demeaning to call his work marketing, but in some small ways it was. He shared a message with his community and nation that ultimately spoke of the gospel story of freedom and redemption. He obviously didn’t use postcards and Facebook and sermon graphics, but he did use marches and rallies and non-violent protest.

More the rest of the story here.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kevin Hendricks

Kevin Hendricks

Kevin D. Hendricks lives in St. Paul, Minn., with his wife, three kids and two dogs. He runs his own freelance writing and editing company, Monkey Outta Nowhere. He’s been blogging since 1998, tweeting since 2007 and generally enjoys being a web geek. After growing up in the distant suburbs of Detroit he moved to St. Paul, Minn., to attend Bethel College (now University). He graduated in 2000 with a degree in writing and a minor in art, got married and started a job with the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association—all in the span of two weeks. In 2004 he began his journey of self-employment, which nicely complements his introverted nature.

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Recent Comments
I grew up attending relatively small churches where everyone knew everybody and if you'd been there 5 minutes, you weren't a stranger anymore. Unfortunately that doesn't seem to be the case anymore, whether it's a large church or a small one. I do not actively attend church because the churches I have visited failed to extend a welcome. The greeter simply said "hello" and handed me a bulletin, during the "greeting time" the congregation only greeted those they knew, and, although I filled out a visitor's care as requested, I never heard a word from anyone after my visit. No phone call, no letter, no post card. I'm not sure how congregations expect to spread the gospel when can't be bothered to even be friendly!
 
— asticatsmom
 
Website and/or bulletins need to be clear on what is expected of kids during the service. Are they expected to stay during the service? Or is there a nursery or Children's Church they should attend during the service? Where is it? For what ages? And when do you take them there - at beginning of service or sometime after the music or whatnot? Does the pastor make an announcement or are the kids just supposed to go at some point? Do I take them or does a teacher gather the kids and lead them to the classroom at that point? Every church does it different and I've yet to see any of this info on a church website or in a bulletin. I usually have to ask someone when I get there and if that someone doesn't have kids they usually don't know either!
 
— Amanda
 
I hate the meet and greet. Do pastors think that 15 random strangers shaking my hand for .5 seconds will make me feel welcome? It is just insincere, when you spend 30 seconds talking to your friends and don't even ask my name. I really hate the "please raise your hand if you are new". The hand raising and random amens at the end of each paragraph are distracting and selfish acts meant to draw attention to the church goer, and away from the message. The other thing that I can't stand is hearing people gossip. Of course they don't gossip to a guest, but we all hear it, and it just makes you all seem fake. For those of you that think that none of this should matter... when your church pushes away new members, you are no longer serving God and are serving yourself.
 
— Matthew
 

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