Creating Memorable Guest Experiences is More Important Than You Know

Customer service consultants frequently suggest mapping the journey and defining the touchpoints of customer-company interactions.  But perhaps this map and these touchpoints miss the most important part of the journey – memory.  Perhaps the memory of the experience is more important than the experience itself.

Watch Daniel Kahneman in this TED video, keeping customer experience in mind, and see how your thinking changes.  Try substituting ‘customer satisfaction’ when the speaker says ‘happiness’.  (Resist temptation and watch without reading ahead.)

[Vision Curator’s Note: Your Guests are your “customers,” so think “Guest satisfaction” when Dr. Kahneman says “happiness” in this video. When you do, it will be a whole new ballgame.]









Now, reflect on these questions…

  1. Do attempts to map the journey address the experience or the memory of the experience?
  2. When improving the customer experience are efforts focused on the ‘experiencing self’ or the ‘remembering self’?
  3. Could this effect (i.e. the difference between happiness with an experience and the memory of our happiness) explain why customers have greater loyalty to companies that make mistakes and recover versus those that have flawless execution to begin with?
  4. Is the meaningful part of the experience really the memory of it?  Do people tweet about the experience or do they tweet about their memory of the experience?
  5. What makes experiences memorable?

If the ‘remembering self’ tells stories and makes decisions and if our happiness with an experience can be (and is) fundamentally different than our memories of the experience, then the pivot point is that creating memorable customer experiences is essential.  We must address both the journey and the memory of the journey in our efforts.  Perhaps this is what is meant by the Japanese proverb, “When you have completed 95 percent of your journey, you are only halfway there.”

Read more from Andrew here.

Download PDF

Tags: , ,

| What is MyVisionRoom? > | Back to Process >


Andrew McFarland

See more articles by >


What say you? Leave a comment!

Recent Comments
I like it Mac and do agree with your opinions on the matter. Thanks much
— winston
In this era, we have the opportunity of professional church staff today who utilize their gifting to shape the image and atmosphere of the church organization. But the 100% real impact on the church visitors is genuine evidence of changed lives by the gospel and the active growing discipleship (just as it was in the first century church). One demonstration is financially rich believers ministering equally together with poor believers (how odd, and incredibly miraculous; all humble and bow at the foot of the cross.). It is the awesome contrast of church members vocations, race, gender, age, maturity, gifting, humility that demonstrates to visitors "there is a Spirit in the place". That first-time guest list of 10 are "physical excuses", not spiritual excuses. Those don't tell the story. The condition of facilities and publicly greeting people have zero to do with it. The power of God in and through believers lives dedicated to impact other people with their relationship bridge-building of acceptance of the lost around them. Empowered believers are infectious, loving, helpful, giving, self-less, dynamic, compelling, bold, Christ-filled. As I have been in many church settings domestically and internationally, the facilities can be poor, and yet the fellowship can still be rich. We need to operate with first church humility. People come to Christ on His terms, not on our human abilities of hospitality. A huge catastrophe in a community, disaster relief brings lots of people into churches – many come to the church in those terrible conditions no matter the physical condition of the local church. Off the condition of facility, and onto the condition of God's people (living stones).... and everything else will grow.... and the other physical issues will be corrected by the staff.
— Russ Wright
"While I understand the intent behind this phrase" Expound please. What do you understand to be the intent behind that phrase?
— Ken

Clarity Process

Three effective ways to start moving toward clarity right now.