Set HIGH Expectations for Your Guests This Weekend

A Note from the VisionRoom Curator: My friend Scott McKain is an internationally known authority who helps organizations create distinction in every phase of business and teaches the “Ultimate Customer Experience.” During our special August emphasis on Guest Experiences, Scott graciously agreed to let us use a blog post on customer experience. But don’t worry – when you hear “customer” just insert the word “Guest” and you will come away with a powerful lesson to share with your Guest Experience teams.

What are the FIRST WORDS that a Guest hears when they make contact with you or your organization?

If you haven’t planned it — or, if you’re satisfied with a generic, “Can I help you?” — then those professionals who deliver an enthusiastic welcome…and set a high expectation for the Guest of what’s about to happen…will leave you behind!

This 1 1/2 minute video suggests the importance of setting HIGH Guest expectations — and why it is so important. Click on the image to launch the video.


> Read more from Scott.

> Read more about the “Taxi Terry” story Scott mentioned in the video.

Start a conversation with our team. We’re glad to offer our input. Your vision is at stake, so let’s talk.

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Scott McKain

Scott McKain

Scott McKain is an internationally known authority who helps organizations create distinction in every phase of business and teaches the “Ultimate Customer Experience.” His keynote presentations benefit from three decades of experience, combined with his innate talent for articulating successful ideas. McKain has spoken before and consulted for the world’s most influential corporations. Scott McKain creates captivating presentations and bestselling books which clearly reveal how to create more compelling connections between you and your customers and how to stand out and move up, regardless of the economic climate in your industry.

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Recent Comments
I like it Mac and do agree with your opinions on the matter. Thanks much
— winston
In this era, we have the opportunity of professional church staff today who utilize their gifting to shape the image and atmosphere of the church organization. But the 100% real impact on the church visitors is genuine evidence of changed lives by the gospel and the active growing discipleship (just as it was in the first century church). One demonstration is financially rich believers ministering equally together with poor believers (how odd, and incredibly miraculous; all humble and bow at the foot of the cross.). It is the awesome contrast of church members vocations, race, gender, age, maturity, gifting, humility that demonstrates to visitors "there is a Spirit in the place". That first-time guest list of 10 are "physical excuses", not spiritual excuses. Those don't tell the story. The condition of facilities and publicly greeting people have zero to do with it. The power of God in and through believers lives dedicated to impact other people with their relationship bridge-building of acceptance of the lost around them. Empowered believers are infectious, loving, helpful, giving, self-less, dynamic, compelling, bold, Christ-filled. As I have been in many church settings domestically and internationally, the facilities can be poor, and yet the fellowship can still be rich. We need to operate with first church humility. People come to Christ on His terms, not on our human abilities of hospitality. A huge catastrophe in a community, disaster relief brings lots of people into churches – many come to the church in those terrible conditions no matter the physical condition of the local church. Off the condition of facility, and onto the condition of God's people (living stones).... and everything else will grow.... and the other physical issues will be corrected by the staff.
— Russ Wright
"While I understand the intent behind this phrase" Expound please. What do you understand to be the intent behind that phrase?
— Ken

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