What is the Value of Your Guest Experience?

What is the value of your Guest Experience?

Go back and read the previous sentence again, this time attaching the mathematical meaning to the word “value.” That’s value, as in a numerical quantity that is assigned or is determined by calculation or measurement.

Dr. Len Berry, Distinguished Professor in Retailing and Marketing at Texas A&M, has developed a form of “experiential math” that was originally designed to focus on the specifics of service delivery. In the ongoing quest to translate customer service practices from the corporate world to Guest Experiences in ChurchWorld, I have modified Dr. Berry’s math just a little.

In order to demonstrate the intricacy and complexity of a Guest Experience in your church, consider the following three variables to be mastered and managed:

  • Guests’ expectations of what is about to happen
  • The outcome that actually does happen
  • Guests’ observations of everything that goes on in-between

The critical part of this formula is in the way you do the math. The three separate variables above don’t add up to a cumulative total. They are multiplied. That difference is crucial.

When you add 6 + 4 + 0, you get 10, no matter which way you arrange the order of the numbers. On the other hand, when you multiply 6 x 4 x 0, you get zero, regardless of the numerical sequence. When you’re adding, the presence of zero doesn’t change the total.

However, the complexity of your Guest Experience is like multiplication, not addition.

When one of the numbers (variables) is zero, it wipes out everything else, regardless of the other numbers involved. All three variables have to be positives for anything significant to be produced.

If you are going to manage the total Guest experience in such a way as to obtain a positive outcome, each variable must be positive in the eyes of your Guests. If just one significant variable leaves the Guest with a “zero,” guess what – the entire value of the experience is a zero.

Take a look around at your Guest Experience variables – and you do the math.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Bob Adams

Bob Adams

Bob is an absolute fanatic about Guest Experiences, growing up watching his father serve customers at the gas station he built and operated for 44 years. Bob is continually connecting with corporate leaders in the customer experience world, learning and then translating practices for ChurchWorld. He writes, speaks, and consults on the topic frequently. Best of all, he is a front-line practitioner at Elevation Church, serving in various roles at the Uptown and Lake Norman Campuses. Vocationally, Bob has a dual role at Auxano, a clarity first consulting firm serving the church. As Vision Room Curator and Digital Engagement Leader he researches, edits, writes and publishes online content. As Guest Experiences Navigator, he leverages his passion, providing Guest Perspective Evaluations and Guest Experience Blueprints. Bob and his wife Anita have been married for 35 years. They have 4 children, 2 daughters-in-law, 1 son-in-law, and 4 grandchildren.

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COMMENTS

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Recent Comments
If someone wants entertainment they're going to the wrong place. Church is not a place for entertainment...or in my opinion a barrage of coffee and donuts. Why are churches today bringing the world INTO them? Then there's the thing with children...age appropriate??? These little guys can pick stuff up in service. Besides Jesus said Suffer little children, and forbid them not, to come unto me: for of such is the kingdom of heaven. Mt. 19:14.
 
— Laurie
 
I love the intentionality here as well as the challenge to look at the data. That's missing so many times. I would like to offer a contrarian's take. Church members and regular attenders have so many ways to get information: Announcements, bulletins, social channels, relationships, and email being among the options. But brand new people are likely going to check out the website and that's it. It might be wiser for churches with limited time and resources to focus their website almost exclusively to guests. This group of people isn't looking for a calendar of events but wants to know about regular programs. They probably aren't interested in watching all of the messages but instead may want to preview one of the services. For the times we need church members to go to websites (sign up for camp, join a group, etc), we're probably better off designing and promoting a specific page rather than cluttering up the homepage.
 
— Michael Lukaszewski (@mlukaszewski)
 
A great question! Unfortunately, the Church Unique Kit is no longer available in print form. We are working on revising it and updating it into an online experience, but that project is at least six months out. An alternative is to come to an upcoming certification class. There is one May 15-18 in Houston, and October 23-26 in Atlanta.
 
— VRcurator
 

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