You Have to Earn the Privilege to Keep From Being Boring

A challenge for communicators is to continually tackle the work we do, regardless of how fun and exciting it is. Sometimes, it’s downright boring. This is part four of a five-part series tackling boring vs. fun in church communication.

One of the most fun and fulfilling things we get to do in church communication is to come up with and roll out cool, creative new ways for promoting our ministries. There is never a shortage of great new ideas and opportunities that would bring us much joy and satisfaction to work on and implement. What a gift and privilege.

We should never take for granted that we must earn the privilege to keep doing what we do. Our credibility or track record is what affords us this privilege.

Read how Kelvin suggests we build our credibility over time here.

Read Part 3 of the series here.

Read more from Kelvin here.

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COMMENTS

What say you? Leave a comment!

Rod Thorpe — 10/11/16 12:56 pm

I feel "unqualified" as a lay minister, no seminary, but 50 years teaching Sunday School, and now at 84, I teach in 3 nursing homes each week. Thank you, thank you for your VERY helpful articles. You give me lots of help I need, but don't know where to find it. I "translate" church to mean our fellowship, or "circle of friends"...we have about 60 each week. They cannot go to church...so we take church to them. God bless you, friend.

Recent Comments
What happens when u dont have a meeting place any more. And u was forced out because the buliding wasnt available any more.
 
— Debra
 
If someone wants entertainment they're going to the wrong place. Church is not a place for entertainment...or in my opinion a barrage of coffee and donuts. Why are churches today bringing the world INTO them? Then there's the thing with children...age appropriate??? These little guys can pick stuff up in service. Besides Jesus said Suffer little children, and forbid them not, to come unto me: for of such is the kingdom of heaven. Mt. 19:14.
 
— Laurie
 
I love the intentionality here as well as the challenge to look at the data. That's missing so many times. I would like to offer a contrarian's take. Church members and regular attenders have so many ways to get information: Announcements, bulletins, social channels, relationships, and email being among the options. But brand new people are likely going to check out the website and that's it. It might be wiser for churches with limited time and resources to focus their website almost exclusively to guests. This group of people isn't looking for a calendar of events but wants to know about regular programs. They probably aren't interested in watching all of the messages but instead may want to preview one of the services. For the times we need church members to go to websites (sign up for camp, join a group, etc), we're probably better off designing and promoting a specific page rather than cluttering up the homepage.
 
— Michael Lukaszewski (@mlukaszewski)
 

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