Vision Pathway

What is the Vision Pathway?

The Vision Pathway is a one-of-a-kind process that provides a framework to deliver unique and comprehensive Vision Clarity for your organization.

We believe God is doing something cosmically significant and locally specific in your church. By engaging in a challenging process of praying, listening, and interacting with your team around certain key questions, it is possible to articulate the unique vision God has for your church and take practical steps to align your church to move toward that vision.

The Vision Pathway walks through 5 key steps.

 

Rethinking Vision

The first step on the Vision Pathway is to rethink your entire approach to vision. True vision isn’t something that can be copied from another ministry. Do you believe that there is a truly unique God-inspired vision for your church? What barriers or models need to be broken in order to find the unique calling God has for you?

 

 

Uncovering Uniqueness with the Kingdom Concept

Every church has a unique style and approach to fulfilling the Great Commission to make disciples. The Kingdom Concept should articulate that uniqueness by finding the overlap of three key elements—place, people, and passion. By understanding the overlap of these three unique pieces of your church, you can unlock your Kingdom Concept that articulates the essence of who you are.

 

 

Talking Up Vision with the Vision Frame

Missional vision will answer five fundamental questions in a clear, concise, and compelling way. Your unique vision is then articulated in a tool called the Vision Frame, which is made up of 5 key elements: mission (what are we doing?), values (why are we doing it?), strategy (how are we doing it?), measures (when are we successful?), and vision proper (where is God
taking us?).

 

The fifth element of the Vision Frame is so important to your ministry’s future that it becomes a separate step on the Vision Pathway.

 

Looking Ahead with Vision Proper

Vision Proper is the living language that illustrates and anticipates God’s better future for your church. It’s the language he will use to talk about the next hill and he will take together, painting a picture of where you are going. Vision Proper must include both inspiring language and a single, specific goal. The combination of these will propel your church forward toward the unique mission God has given you.

 

 

Living it Out with the Integration Model

Vision is realized only to the extent that it is integrated into the life of the church, one conversation at a time. There are five important areas of integration that transcend the typical silos of ministry. These areas form the Integration Model: Developing Leadership, Intentional Communication, Duplicatable Process, Compelling Environments, and Conscious Culture. Each of these areas require intentional and focused efforts to be properly aligned with the vision frame. Together, they form an incredibly strong framework of alignment and movement toward your mission.

 

 

If you would like more information about the Vision Pathway, you can download the free Church Unique Visual Summary or purchase the Church Unique book from our store.

You’ll find all sorts of resources to help you walk the Vision Pathway right here in the Vision Room. Or, contact us to set up a consultation with a trained Auxano Navigator who can walk alongside your organization, guiding you through the Vision Pathway.

The important thing is to begin to walk the Vision Pathway so that you articulate your unique Vision Frame. The resulting clarity in all facets of your organization will allow you to live out your vision in powerful ways, moving your church forward.

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Recent Comments
I love Ed's writings and heart. I am frustrated by these articles, however. Much of the missiological basis of the Church Growth Movement are not mentioned, and the origination of the formulas are not substantiated. Also, the Movement via Wagner, started mentioning the importance of health over 3o years ago. I wish these articles were better researched and less sweeping in their generalizations. Things like E1, E2, E3 evangelism, group multiplication, relational networks, faith, health, and the care to measure the right things are largely missing here. Perhaps Ed has earned the right to generalize, but I still was disappointed. But keep researching Ed! Ed and Thom have continued on in the spirit of the movement by doing quality research, and for that I am deeply grateful.
 
— Gary Westra
 
This discussion will continue, for sure. I am tasked with the online worship ministry do our church at FBC Trussville and it is proving to be an important piece of the overall ministry. As in most things In life and technology, balance is in order. Many of our older adults prefer the "live" service online rather than a week or even day-later DVD or downloaded service. They tell me it is important for them to be a part while the service occurs. This is key because if a person simply wanted the message or music or to see the pastor because they "like" him, then it would not need to be live. There is a sense with our people that they need to experience the worship with their church family in real time. Theologically, folks will have issues. This is a disruptive technology for church. But I would hope that before we toss it all away we would approach it with wisdom and humility. Personally, I would like to see the Church grow through small, cost-effective ways like this and not just brick-and-mortar.
 
— Robby
 
It seems this was written awhile ago but I would like to respond. Mr. Surratt makes great points. Points that should be taken seriously by all churches. I just do not think these points are the main reason people are not coming back to churches. Who knows the exact reason why anyone does not come back unless they tell you, but I can say with certainty the reasons I do not return are usually the same. 1. Love, tolerance, and acceptance. (unbelievers, baby Christians) Church members seem to want their guests or potential members to behave a certain way. They want them to conform to the system that is already in place. In some ways this is understandable. In other ways, it is isolating to the guest. They want to feel loved and accepted the way they are. They want to be told everything is ok no matter their past. They want to be given time to work out their immediate more pressing issues without having to worry about what to wear and how to talk (church speak). 2. Love, tolerance, and acceptance (believers, unchurched) Many times, these people are looking for what fits their already preconceived ideas of what "good churches" are. These preconceived notions are difficult to overcome and some of them were addressed in Mr. Surratt's article. But I can tell you that a truly loving, a truly tolerant, and a truly accepting church can overcome most of these things. You may never be able to overcome a taste in music, or a theological difference, but most everything else can be healed with Love. 3. People can see the business aspect of the church. I see it almost immediately when I walk into certain churches for the first time. I think people understand that a church has many aspects of itself that are business oriented. I just believe they dont want to experience these aspects when they visit. How many churches are so focused on growth, in numbers of bodies, that they forget the growth of the heart? The American church is now fully Americanized. Its a show and a numbers game. People come to church, especially new comers, CRAVING to fill a void in their life. If you are offering the same thing they can get in the real world, how are you any different? There are plenty of other reasons people do not return and many may not be avoidable. However, the church as a whole needs to reevaluate the arena in which they are playing. The simplicity of the Gospel is good enough to fulfill the hearts of the unbelievers and restore the prodigal's to a relationship with Christ. Love thy neighbor as thyself and love thy God with all your heart.
 
— Shay Wallace
 

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