Vision Pathway

What is the Vision Pathway?

The Vision Pathway is a one-of-a-kind process that provides a framework to deliver unique and comprehensive Vision Clarity for your organization.

We believe God is doing something cosmically significant and locally specific in your church. By engaging in a challenging process of praying, listening, and interacting with your team around certain key questions, it is possible to articulate the unique vision God has for your church and take practical steps to align your church to move toward that vision.

The Vision Pathway walks through 5 key steps.


Rethinking Vision

The first step on the Vision Pathway is to rethink your entire approach to vision. True vision isn’t something that can be copied from another ministry. Do you believe that there is a truly unique God-inspired vision for your church? What barriers or models need to be broken in order to find the unique calling God has for you?



Uncovering Uniqueness with the Kingdom Concept

Every church has a unique style and approach to fulfilling the Great Commission to make disciples. The Kingdom Concept should articulate that uniqueness by finding the overlap of three key elements—place, people, and passion. By understanding the overlap of these three unique pieces of your church, you can unlock your Kingdom Concept that articulates the essence of who you are.



Talking Up Vision with the Vision Frame

Missional vision will answer five fundamental questions in a clear, concise, and compelling way. Your unique vision is then articulated in a tool called the Vision Frame, which is made up of 5 key elements: mission (what are we doing?), values (why are we doing it?), strategy (how are we doing it?), measures (when are we successful?), and vision proper (where is God
taking us?).


The fifth element of the Vision Frame is so important to your ministry’s future that it becomes a separate step on the Vision Pathway.


Looking Ahead with Vision Proper

Vision Proper is the living language that illustrates and anticipates God’s better future for your church. It’s the language he will use to talk about the next hill and he will take together, painting a picture of where you are going. Vision Proper must include both inspiring language and a single, specific goal. The combination of these will propel your church forward toward the unique mission God has given you.



Living it Out with the Integration Model

Vision is realized only to the extent that it is integrated into the life of the church, one conversation at a time. There are five important areas of integration that transcend the typical silos of ministry. These areas form the Integration Model: Developing Leadership, Intentional Communication, Duplicatable Process, Compelling Environments, and Conscious Culture. Each of these areas require intentional and focused efforts to be properly aligned with the vision frame. Together, they form an incredibly strong framework of alignment and movement toward your mission.



If you would like more information about the Vision Pathway, you can download the free Church Unique Visual Summary or purchase the Church Unique book from our store.

You’ll find all sorts of resources to help you walk the Vision Pathway right here in the Vision Room. Or, contact us to set up a consultation with a trained Auxano Navigator who can walk alongside your organization, guiding you through the Vision Pathway.

The important thing is to begin to walk the Vision Pathway so that you articulate your unique Vision Frame. The resulting clarity in all facets of your organization will allow you to live out your vision in powerful ways, moving your church forward.

Learn more about living out your vision >
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Recent Comments
They feel very big and hard to get my hands around- for one, how do I hear from God? Prayer. Scripture? "And puts it into practice" allows for misplaced motives right? Becoming like Jesus feels so "mountain top" it is overwhelming. Seems like there is more needed in identifying wins in this journey but love the effort and intentionality
— David bartosik
Priesthood of all believers....I believe it, but if its not, in your unhelpful words, the "talented leader who explains the Bible" who does? Who is explaining the bible to the priesthood? If its not the pastor, then fire him and hire the other guy.... You may answer, "the priesthood should be reading the bible for themselves"..."the priesthood is able to go directly to God"... TRUE, BUT many, including many clergy, aren't interested in God or if they are feel stupid that they cant read the bible or know how to see and hear from God for themselves thru his word. Where does that leave us? Who helps these people? Thats what discipleship is...clergy leading a deliberate pursuit of a few and helping them see God for themselves in scripture and see it transform their lives...and multiply into the lives of others. But you seem to argument against that..... 1. You hate Centralized Spirituality saying its Unhealthy: The big idea you seem to be driving at was the "de-centralizing" of clergies role while simultaneously asking for a discipleship system to be constructed....who is responsible to construct this system if not the clergy whom the church has entrusted with that role? 2. You dont think that "God planned for one person to disciple an entire church, and He didn’t design us to grow via mass discipleship." So if not one person ( a church that budgets for one pastor) or a staff of vocational pastors (a church that allocates rescues for multiple pastors) who drives this? of course there are other leaders but who is at the center? 3. Seems obvious, but you said Discipleship Thrives in Spiritual Small Groups...yes but how is this small group system managed? There is no way you say, just go do small groups and see what happens right? Study what you want, who cares who leads, who cares who comes, figure it out by yourself...youre a priest good luck! There is a checks and balances system that would be helpful right? There is support, there is direction....Who is the gatekeeper determining the quality of the group and supporting, encouraging and driving its health? all questions that I hope are helpful for the church, the article seems like its trying to give easy answers to an incredibly challenging idea. It seems to be attacking clergy rather than helping them see the enormity of what the people of God and God himself have entrusted to them. Help pastors step into the role of discipler, being supported by the elders, and investing their lives and conversations into helping people see God thru scripture deliberately and consistently...unwavering to any fad or program that may distract us.
— david bartosik
This resonated strongly with me. My pastor, a strong, wise, intelligent, and compassionate woman in her 40's, made the decision to take on my church almost 3 years ago. We were a very small, struggling congregation, facing closure. In our interview with her, we were very clear about the reality of our situation, and offered her an interim position, thinking that we would be closing very soon. She chose, instead, to be our called pastor, despite the odds facing her. She has gone over, above, and beyond in helping us stay afloat, but this has come at a great price, emotionally and physically. Because most of our congregants are older, they have limited energy and resources, and so many of the things which could be delegated by our pastor, she ends up doing herself, and so she faces burnout regularly. She has gotten better at taking personal time off, but I can still see that her spirit and energy are frequently flagging. And, even though we are relatively stable financially - due to renting our spaces to others - the added issues that come with renters occupy a lot of her time and energy. As her assistant, I do what I can to help ease these burdens, but I have limitations, as well, which prevent me from taking on more responsibilities. My fear is that my pastor will one day reach the end of her pastoral rope, and we may lose her. I will be sure to pass on this article to her, and continue to encourage her in her self care. Thank you for your frankness and insight.
— Monica Spangenberg

Clarity Process

Three effective ways to start moving toward clarity right now.