More About Integration Model

The Integration Model: Living Out Your Vision

Vision is realized only to the extent that is integrated into the life of the church, one conversation at a time. Movement is made not with great vision-casting alone, but with small, ever-present steps of integration. Once you have walked the Vision Pathway, you will need to align your organization with your newly crafted Vision Frame so that you can live it out in meaningful ways.

There are five important areas of integration that transcend the typical silos of ministry. These areas form the Integration Model:

Developing Leadership

Recruit, train, and organize leaders based on vision.

Intentional Communication

Reinforce vision with great design and clear language.

Duplicatable Process

Build systems that support and expand your vision.

Compelling Environments

Embed vision deeply into every environment.

Conscious Culture

Reflect vision by using story, symbol, and scripture.


Each of these areas requires intentional and focused efforts to be properly aligned with the Vision Frame. Together, they form an incredibly strong framework of alignment and movement toward your mission.

We’ve organize the resources here in the Vision Room according to these five areas of the Integration Model. Take advantage of the best thinking and learning of other leaders in these areas and apply them to your specific context.

Or, contact us to set up a consultation  with a trained Auxano Navigator that can walk alongside you as you align your organization with your Vision Frame.

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Recent Comments
This resonated strongly with me. My pastor, a strong, wise, intelligent, and compassionate woman in her 40's, made the decision to take on my church almost 3 years ago. We were a very small, struggling congregation, facing closure. In our interview with her, we were very clear about the reality of our situation, and offered her an interim position, thinking that we would be closing very soon. She chose, instead, to be our called pastor, despite the odds facing her. She has gone over, above, and beyond in helping us stay afloat, but this has come at a great price, emotionally and physically. Because most of our congregants are older, they have limited energy and resources, and so many of the things which could be delegated by our pastor, she ends up doing herself, and so she faces burnout regularly. She has gotten better at taking personal time off, but I can still see that her spirit and energy are frequently flagging. And, even though we are relatively stable financially - due to renting our spaces to others - the added issues that come with renters occupy a lot of her time and energy. As her assistant, I do what I can to help ease these burdens, but I have limitations, as well, which prevent me from taking on more responsibilities. My fear is that my pastor will one day reach the end of her pastoral rope, and we may lose her. I will be sure to pass on this article to her, and continue to encourage her in her self care. Thank you for your frankness and insight.
— Monica Spangenberg
Even short mini retreats witb a group of colleagues is helpful... just sharing how it is withyour soul can move mountains of despair into the sea...
— Rick Pittenger
Oh yes -- and were the mountains not five long hours away... but the occasional day when I just plain do not get out of bed is good -- and going to the movies is good -- OUTDOORS is good...all closer to home and not so much with the carbon footprint, you know?
— Crimson Rambler

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