Facebook’s Five Core Values and What It Means for Your Ministry

When Mark Zuckerberg wrote a letter to potential investors, he unpacked the five values that guide everything at Facebook.


Focus on Impact: Solve the most important problems that make the biggest difference.  Zuckerberg reminds his team that it’s very easy to waste time.

Move Fast: Facebook employees are encouraged to “move fast and break things.” The assumption is, if you’re not breaking things, you’re probably not moving fast enough.

Be Bold: The goal at Facebook is to create a culture that takes risks.  The banner for this value is “The riskiest thing is to take no risks.”

Be Open: Being open means giving people as much access to information as possible to make better decisions.

Build Social Value: Facebook exists to make the world more open and connected, and not just to build a company.


  • Great leaders get things done by creating culture. That’s why values matter. Church leaders often get stuck in a ministry treadmill of “doing church” without clarifying, “What kind of culture are we trying to nourish?” Do a values test: Does your team know the top five ideals or motives of your ministry?
  • These values show us how even the most innovative aspects of technology and communication are working intently to keep changing. As the envelope is pushed, how will leadership role adapt? Here are some questions to consider:
    • Who can you spend time with to learn more about social media?
    • How is your ministry investing in better communication technology?
    • What new team role do you need to stay more innovative?
    • How are you giving people permission to make mistakes in the name of positive risk and bold mission?
  • Values always take us to the heart of a group of people; to that flame deep inside the collective soul. The fifth value of Facebook reminds people that its not about the organization. Rather, its about something great happening in the world, that changes everyday reality. What traps us in ministry is that our world-changing ideas are limited to how we preach and not how shape a church culture. Again, its not about the church organization per se, but the deeper reason of existence.  What are values in the heart of the congregation that will continue inspiring impact after a great sermon, class, group or event?
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Will Mancini

Will Mancini

Will Mancini wants you and your ministry to experience the benefits of stunning, God-given clarity. As a pastor turned vision coach, Will has worked with an unprecedented variety of churches from growing megachurches and missional communities, to mainline revitalization and church plants. He is the founder of Auxano, creator of VisionRoom.com and the author of God Dreams and Church Unique.

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Recent Comments
I like it Mac and do agree with your opinions on the matter. Thanks much
— winston
In this era, we have the opportunity of professional church staff today who utilize their gifting to shape the image and atmosphere of the church organization. But the 100% real impact on the church visitors is genuine evidence of changed lives by the gospel and the active growing discipleship (just as it was in the first century church). One demonstration is financially rich believers ministering equally together with poor believers (how odd, and incredibly miraculous; all humble and bow at the foot of the cross.). It is the awesome contrast of church members vocations, race, gender, age, maturity, gifting, humility that demonstrates to visitors "there is a Spirit in the place". That first-time guest list of 10 are "physical excuses", not spiritual excuses. Those don't tell the story. The condition of facilities and publicly greeting people have zero to do with it. The power of God in and through believers lives dedicated to impact other people with their relationship bridge-building of acceptance of the lost around them. Empowered believers are infectious, loving, helpful, giving, self-less, dynamic, compelling, bold, Christ-filled. As I have been in many church settings domestically and internationally, the facilities can be poor, and yet the fellowship can still be rich. We need to operate with first church humility. People come to Christ on His terms, not on our human abilities of hospitality. A huge catastrophe in a community, disaster relief brings lots of people into churches – many come to the church in those terrible conditions no matter the physical condition of the local church. Off the condition of facility, and onto the condition of God's people (living stones).... and everything else will grow.... and the other physical issues will be corrected by the staff.
— Russ Wright
"While I understand the intent behind this phrase" Expound please. What do you understand to be the intent behind that phrase?
— Ken

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