Interdependence Day

It may seem odd to discuss interdependence when many people are celebrating independence this week on July 4. In leadership, however, independence may be inadvisable. The reality is interdependent leaders are the ones enabling happiness in their organizations, teams, and communities.

Leading with interdependence means two or more people or things are mutually dependent upon each other. Interdependent leaders are stronger than independent ones because of the relationships built and maintained.

Here are four interdependent relationships to enable leaders to succeed more fully and purposefully.

1 – Learning Interdependence.

Good leaders learn. There is a mutual dependency on books, mentors, and other leaders to stretch our minds, our attitudes, our motivations, and our approaches. Leaders who do not have an interdependent learning relationship become stale and outdated, stuck in old ways and inadequate traditions.

It is more than the taking in of information and ideas though. It also is in the giving. Leaders who teach and share lift up all leaders within their circle of influence. It is a give-and-take relationship in learning, which energizes strong, interdependent leaders.

2 – Team Interdependence.

Teams contain all sorts of characters. The best teams are the ones where everyone brings their strengths along with their humility, best listening skills, and finest ideas. Teams that are self-managing are the most interdependent group of leaders possible. Nonetheless, even if there is a single leader designated for a team, the leader can only be successful if the team works well together.

Interdependence of human skills and insights is what will bring out the best in all team leaders.

A team of independents will lead to an entanglement of egos and a frustration of efforts. A team of interdependent leaders will lead to empowered achievement.

3 – Community Interdependence.

Interdependent leaders know community is where the next generation of leaders will spring. Leave our communities alone and the talent will slip backwards rather than upwards. Communities feed off of solid leaders, and leaders feed off of solid community. The tighter the interdependence, the higher the potential for long term advancement. The advancements come in the form of:

  • Greater involvement in activities
  • More commitment to people
  • More conversations on how to lead
  • Higher learning, raising the standards in knowledge and insights

4 – Integrity Interdependence.

Integrity translates into leadership and life values; it is the way to lead and live in a non-harmful and inspired way. Our leadership values need to be defined and then fully practiced in everyday situations. Integrity and values need to be our high standard of conduct – something to strive to and be held accountable for. Herein is the crux of integrity interdependence.

A leader without integrity is an independent, soulless one. Integrity without leaders is just a concept.

For integrity to come alive, leaders need to embrace it. For leaders to lead effectively, integrity needs to be upheld. More than the relationship between leader and integrity is the need for both to be demonstrated actively in our teams, organizations, communities, and families.

Leadership interdependence…

  • Are you ready to celebrate it and see the true joy in leadership?
  • Are you ready to embrace your leadership interdependencies?

 

I hope so. Happy Leadership Interdependence!

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jon Mertz

Jon is a vice president of marketing in the healthcare software industry. His background consists of an MBA from The University of Texas at Austin and working for companies like Deloitte, IBM, and BMC Software. Outside of his professional life, Jon explores how life choices really define who we are. Our choices define us more than words spoken or written. After all, choices lead to actions. Connect with Jon on Twitter @ThinDifference or on Facebook.

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COMMENTS

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Recent Comments
Michael - thanks for this article. I've read it over and over and it keeps convicting / encouraging me. I'm a get-it-done leader who can very quickly breeze thru conversations to get to root cause and fix problems. I really need to develop my leadership to be more long-suffering and remember those problems have faces.
 
— Doug
 
I am not surprised with many of these answers. I am not sure how a meet and greet woild cause a person to. leave. I seriously doubt this poll was taken anywhere outside the US. I have been to a church that was a an abandoned warehouse with no windows in the middle of the summer with no AC. I enjoyed it because the word was taught and God was there. Following Christ is selfless not selfish and how can it make me comfortable. I understand to use discernment for new and nonbelievers. Most people that have spoken with that say the church hurt them usually are self perceived hurts. Even so if we are hurt who are we going for ourselves, our friends, or God? God bless.
 
— Tim
 
My pastor passed this onto to his leaders. I read the list with interest. How interesting that something like the following did not make the list of why first time guests leave: “I really felt convicted by the preaching about sin, coming judgment and hell. It was almost like the preacher was speaking directly to me. Made me so mad, I almost ran out of there!” Hmmm. Ray Comfort writes, “John Wesley told his trainee evangelists that, when they preached, people should either get angry or they should get converted. No doubt he wasn’t speaking about the “love, joy, peace Gospel.” Wesley preached sin, righteousness, holiness, judgment, and hell.” Could this be why my objection didn’t make the list? Because in most churches today, liberalism has watered down the gospel like it has dumbed down our kids in schools and handcuffed our law enforcement people and created a generation of career politicians more interested in power and perks than in public service? Mike
 
— Mike French
 

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