Making It Happen: Shifting Your Focus from Something Else to It

See if this sounds familiar. You’re trying to focus on a task at work, but It just won’t leave you alone.

It seizes some significant mental real estate and prevents you from being fully present in the moment. You attempt to suppress your thoughts about It with countless less important activities, but It simply won’t leave. You hope to escape being a mental hostage to It when you are spending time with your family or friends, but still It hangs around, diminishing your ability to enjoy these moments, as well.

Its presence, however, can most strongly be felt when you are trying to rest. You want to physically, emotionally, and mentally relax from the break-neck pace of the day, but thoughts of It keep robbing you of these much needed moments of sacred idleness.

“What is this all powerful It,” you ask?

Simply put, It is your most “Important Thing.”

Those tasks, activities, goals, dreams, and plans that are neglected almost daily in the overwhelming world of working on “something else.” You don’t consciously try to avoid It. You really want to work on It, whether it will take five minutes, five months, or five years, but you aren’t for many reasons.

Because a funnel narrows at the bottom, all of these possibilities vie to become It. In other words, you only have so many hours in the day. So, without a structure or process to manage all those possibilities, you struggle to determine what is important, urgent, or unnecessary. “That’s my world,” you might say. “Every day is full of a million things I could do.” And how you determine what actually comes out of that funnel and gets DONE may be one cause of your dilemma.

It’s time to make It happen!

If you are serious about making It happen more often in your work and life, you need to start doing 6 things every day.

>> Download Jones Loflin’s solutions for getting to It here.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jones Loflin

Jones Loflin is an internationally-recognized speaker, author, and trainer, and the coauthor of the award-winning book Juggling Elephants. For over nineteen years he has developed and delivered solutions for many Fortune 500 companies in the areas of time management, focus, motivation, change, and work-life balance. Todd Musig is a senior training industry executive, consultant, and author with extensive experience in marketing and business operations. He has worked with such authors as Hyrum Smith, Stephen Covey, and Dr. Spencer Johnson, and he is the coauthor of the award-winning book Juggling Elephants.

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COMMENTS

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Recent Comments
Yea! You fixed it!
 
— Mr. Troy Reynolds
 
I just discovered this today and am looking forward to exploring the content on here. It looks like it could be very helpful. Just an FYI - in your paragraph on not putting out B+ material you have a typo. A little ironic. :-) The third sentence begins with "You time" not "Your time."
 
— Troy Reynolds
 
I'm lost, to say the least! As a new pastor, taking over a newly started church I have read just about everything there is to learn what I can do to grow the church. I truly beleive that those attending our church are friendly and sincere. So that can't be the issue. I have read all the comments to this article and I feel that most churches will never have a fair chance! We are a VERY small church, so we don't have a children's church (yet). So if a family comes and gets upset that we don't have a children's church for them to put their children into, we lose! We do provide things for their kids to do during the service and even have an option for their kids to be in a different room, if they don't want their kids to sit with them. We are also such a small church that we don't have a worship team/band/etc. Our worship music comes from music videos. The congregation we do have likes it this way, but of course we would love to have a worhsip team. So, if someone comes to our church and is upset that we don't have live music, we lose! The point I am trying to make is that when people come in with preconceived ideas of what a church should be like, they will never find a church home, unless they find a church who's goal is to entertain! Every Sunday our message comes from the Bible, so that can't be a complaint for someone, so instead, people leave the church and never come back because they want more from a church: they don't want friendly people who are following the Word of God; they want a church that give them something (a babysitter for their kid, entertainment, free gifts, etc.) I'm sorry if sound cynical, I truly want everyone to hear the Good News and learn about Christ's love, but if they come in looking for something else, then the church will always lose!
 
— JAG
 

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