Sparking Creativity and Innovation

A few weeks ago, my wife and I found ourselves in need of a new vehicle after our previous one died on us unexpectedly. We immediately started our research online in hopes of purchasing a well kept, used Prius (a vehicle we had hoped to purchase one day given the current gas prices!). After visiting numerous sites and speaking with friends who had purchased Prius’ in the past, all we could think about was the Prius. We soon became really familiar with all its features, pricing models, customer reviews, and even warranty options. Whenever we were out, we saw countless people driving one. It was as if Toyota had secretly planted Prius’ all over our city in order to convince us of our need to purchase. Needless to say, the Prius was on our minds.

I think that sparking creative ideas works in an analogous fashion. Just as we anticipated to see the Prius around town, creative ideas become visible if we choose to look for them.

It’s not so much that we work extra hard to develop a process that births creativity. Rather, it’s more important that we posture ourselves to carry a mindset that welcomes and looks for creative and innovative thoughts. As Louis Pasteur once said, “Chance favors (only) the prepared mind.”

Unfortunately, many have given up on the notion that they are creative or innovative. They choose not to see the great ideas that swirl around them in their environment. They lose out because they turn a blind eye to opportunity.

Do You See What I See?

  • Take a moment this week to pause and look around you. Are there things that can help trigger creative or innovate thoughts about the things you’re working on?
  • Invite yourself into new, unexpected environments to explore how others unlike you think about the world. Seemingly unrelated concepts often need to clash to spark creativity and innovation.
  • Breathe and write down “random” things that come to mind when you consider your ideas. Overtime, you’ll discover some interesting connections.
  • Watch a film or listen to music outside of what you’re use to. Take some notes on what you like and dislike about what you’re experiencing. Explain why you feel the way you do.
  • Look at Pinterest (yes, Pinterest) boards on design and creativity. It’s a fun, simple way of visually exploring thoughts.

Creative innovation is all around us. Do you see it?

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Charles T. Lee

Charles T. Lee

I'm the Chief Idea-Maker of Ideation Consultancy, Inc., an idea agency that specializes in turning good ideas into remarkable brands by developing innovative business design, strategic infrastructure, strong brand presence, memorable visual identities & design, creative marketing, new media PR strategies, and web presence.

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COMMENTS

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Recent Comments
If someone wants entertainment they're going to the wrong place. Church is not a place for entertainment...or in my opinion a barrage of coffee and donuts. Why are churches today bringing the world INTO them? Then there's the thing with children...age appropriate??? These little guys can pick stuff up in service. Besides Jesus said Suffer little children, and forbid them not, to come unto me: for of such is the kingdom of heaven. Mt. 19:14.
 
— Laurie
 
I love the intentionality here as well as the challenge to look at the data. That's missing so many times. I would like to offer a contrarian's take. Church members and regular attenders have so many ways to get information: Announcements, bulletins, social channels, relationships, and email being among the options. But brand new people are likely going to check out the website and that's it. It might be wiser for churches with limited time and resources to focus their website almost exclusively to guests. This group of people isn't looking for a calendar of events but wants to know about regular programs. They probably aren't interested in watching all of the messages but instead may want to preview one of the services. For the times we need church members to go to websites (sign up for camp, join a group, etc), we're probably better off designing and promoting a specific page rather than cluttering up the homepage.
 
— Michael Lukaszewski (@mlukaszewski)
 
A great question! Unfortunately, the Church Unique Kit is no longer available in print form. We are working on revising it and updating it into an online experience, but that project is at least six months out. An alternative is to come to an upcoming certification class. There is one May 15-18 in Houston, and October 23-26 in Atlanta.
 
— VRcurator
 

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