Jesus Built a Pipeline, Not a Platform

Imagine for a moment never having to say, “I don’t have the right leaders,” or “I don’t have enough leaders.”

What if, in the next few months you could eliminate the need to look outside your own leadership pipeline for your next strategic staff hire?

You can – with two days of training and preparation at Auxano’s all-new Leadership Pipeline Boot Camp in Houston, TX.

Introducing Auxano’s Leadership Pipeline Boot Camp:

Is your church over-programmed and under-discipled?
 Quit talking about it and do something!

Designed by Mac Lake and Will Mancini, the Boot Camp will provide the only toolbox on planet earth that will help you design a leadership pipeline to overcome your recurring leadership development problem. The Boot Camp will include:

  • Two full days training with your team (up to 5)
  • Leadership Pipeline Workbook for each team member
  • Customized Leadership Pipeline Implementation Plan for your church
  • Training Tools for your team
  • A 60-minute, one-on-one virtual coaching session for your church
  • Virtual follow-up sessions with Boot Camp participants
    • Wednesday, November 29, 2017
    • Wednesday, January 10, 2018
    • Wednesday, February 7, 2018
    • Plus two additional dates TBD
  • The virtual follow-up sessions will be run in two identical groups: Group 1 from 10 a.m. to Noon ET, and Group 2 from 1 – 3 p.m. ET.
  • Lunches and breaks throughout the Boot Camp

The Leadership Pipeline Boot Camp will be held at the Clear Creek Community Church in Houston, TX, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Monday and Tuesday, October 23-24. The Clear Lake campus is easily accessible to hotels and restaurants.

Register for the Leadership Pipeline Boot Camp

The $1,995 investment includes registration for up to five members of your church team. Transportation to the host church, local lodging, breakfast, and evening meals are NOT included.

Your Boot Camp Navigators:

Mac Lake – Mac is a pioneering influence in the church planting movement. In 1997, he planted Carolina Forest Community Church (Myrtle Beach, SC). In 2004, he began serving as Leadership Development Pastor at Seacoast Church (Charleston, SC) where he served for over six years. In July 2010 Mac Lake joined with West Ridge Church to become the Visionary Architect for the LAUNCH Network.

David Putman – In 2010 David founded Planting the Gospel, a network of gospel-centered, disciple making churches committed to helping churches grow and multiply disciples. He planted his first church in 1988 and has served as a planter, strategist and coach. His experience includes serving with the North American Mission Board, where he was responsible for setting strategic direction for the Church Planting Group. He also served as Executive Pastor of Mountain Lake Church in the north Atlanta area where he co-founded churchplanters.com.

Join us at the Leadership Pipeline Boot Camp for a collaborative learning environment that will help you design a Leadership Pipeline centered on your vision and focused on building a culture of leadership development emphasizing four essential components.

Register for the Auxano Leadership Pipeline Boot Camp here.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

VRcurator

Bob Adams is Auxano's Vision Room Curator. His background includes over 23 years as an associate/executive pastor as well as 8 years as the Lead Consultant for a church design build company.

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Clarity Process

Three effective ways to start moving toward clarity right now.

How to Achieve Break-Thru with Your Team

What if two days with your team could change the trajectory of your church? 

You are invited to an exclusive gathering limited to 25 church teams at three different cities around an important break-thru topic. Each topic is a critical factor in reaching and discipling people for real church growth. Keep in mind this is not a conference! It is a workshop + coaching process to bring permanent change to the performance of your ministry. That’s what Auxano is all about: deep and lasting culture change based on your vision. It’s Auxano’s Boot Camp Series.

Boot Camp Topics and Locations

The Story Behind the Boot Camp

For the last 16 years Auxano has developed an amazing toolbox in three key areas for every church that goes through our vision process: A guest perspective evaluation, a leadership pipeline build-out, and a pastoral succession roadmap. Now, for the first time, we are bringing those insights, tools and how-to’s to church leaders whether you are going through a vision process or not. Each topic is built on a history of team facilitation and best practices from leading churches of every faith tribe and every size.

Each Boot Camp Features

  • 2-days of training with two master trainers
  • Transferable tools for immediate application in the Fall
  • Follow-up coaching for feedback and implementation support
  • A notebook with how-to templates and examples from model churches
  • A memory making team experience that makes growing your church fun

Break-thru Guarantee

If your attend with your team and find that the Auxano Boot Camp is not the best training you have ever received in the subject matter, we will give you a 100% refund.

Early Bird Special 

Take advantage of a 15% discount if you register before July 17! Use the code EarlyBird15 when registering.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

VRcurator

Bob Adams is Auxano's Vision Room Curator. His background includes over 23 years as an associate/executive pastor as well as 8 years as the Lead Consultant for a church design build company.

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Sorry, the author of this content has removed the links at the original source!
 
— VRcurator
 
The hypertext link is broken for the pdf download - can it be fixed? Thanks!
 
— Steve Elliott
 
What happens when u dont have a meeting place any more. And u was forced out because the buliding wasnt available any more.
 
— Debra
 

Clarity Process

Three effective ways to start moving toward clarity right now.

Auxano’s NEW Boot Camp Series Coming August 29-30!

Coming August 29-30 – 3 brand new, groundbreaking Boot Camps designed to help you gain break-thru clarity in these three critically important areas of your church:

  • Pastoral Succession
  • Leadership Pipeline
  • Guest Experience

The Boot Camps will be held simultaneously in three different locations across the country.

Registration of only $1,995 provides two full days of learning and collaboration for up to five members of your team.

Click on the image below to find out more about each Boot Camp.

Guest Experience Boot Camp-dates

 

Leadership Pipeline Boot Camp-dates

 

Pastoral Succession Boot Camp-dates

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

VRcurator

Bob Adams is Auxano's Vision Room Curator. His background includes over 23 years as an associate/executive pastor as well as 8 years as the Lead Consultant for a church design build company.

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— Debra
 

Clarity Process

Three effective ways to start moving toward clarity right now.

4 Tips for Spotting a Lazy Leader

Lazy leadership is unfaithful stewardship. Instead of wise stewardship, lazy leaders foolishly squander resources, gifting, and opportunities rather than make the most of the brief season in which they are privileged to lead. When attempting to uncover and address laziness, people often look in the wrong places. Lazy leadership is not about office hours, email response time, and vacation days—as someone can be incredibly lazy while checking emails in the office. Here are four ways in which lazy leadership tends to manifest itself:

1. Lazy leaders dump rather than delegate.

It takes work and intentionality to effectively delegate responsibilities to another person. Training, care, and being continually available are all essential in effective delegation. Dumping responsibilities on someone else requires only laziness.

2. Lazy leaders rely on personality rather than preparation.

Here is why laziness does not always reveal itself immediately. Someone can rely on his or her personality for a while, but in time the lack of preparation is obvious.

3. Lazy leaders take on too little rather than too much.

I am not suggesting that it is wise to perpetually take on too much, but lazy leaders never get close to that threshold. They avoid overwork like the plague and err toward taking on too little.

4. Lazy leaders offer excuses rather than results.

Lazy leaders may have new excuses, but they always have excuses. Someone else is always at fault for the lack of execution or follow-through.

The people of God have always understood laziness to be a sin. Laziness is a sin because laziness fails to appreciate the gift and blessing of work and fails to make the most of the time we have been graciously given. The writer of Proverbs exhorts us:

Go to the ant, you slacker! Observe its ways and become wise. Without leader, administrator, or ruler, it prepares its provisions in summer; it gathers its food during harvest. How long will you stay in bed, you slacker? When will you get up from your sleep? A little sleep, a little slumber, a little folding of the arms to rest, and your poverty will come like a robber, your need, like a bandit. (Proverbs 6:6-11)


Developing a Leadership Pipeline will minimize the risks of lazy leaders. Connect with an Auxano Navigator to learn more.


> More from Eric.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Eric Geiger

Eric Geiger serves as the Vice President of the Church Resource Division at LifeWay Christian Resources. Eric received his doctorate in leadership and church ministry from Southern Seminary. He is also a teaching pastor and a frequent speaker and consultant on church mission and strategy. Eric authored or co-authored several books including the best selling church leadership book, Simple Church. Eric is married to Kaye, and they have two daughters: Eden and Evie. During his free time, Eric enjoys dating his wife, playing with his daughters, and shooting basketball.

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Clarity Process

Three effective ways to start moving toward clarity right now.

5 Questions for Living Small and Dreaming Big

Church growth and impact over the last decade extend beyond the megachurches we hear of most often. The small church has been on the rise as well, freed from past restraints of limited resources and underdeveloped vision. Innovation and technology are driving a new wave of exponential impact.

Small churches are finding ways to leverage bivocational staffing. Some are giving away as much as 50 percent of their resources. Others are seating fewer people in one place, but reaching more across multiple campuses and online.

These churches are as likely to exist in small towns and impoverished areas as they are in rapidly growing metropolitan suburbs. For many church leaders, it’s a great time for living small and dreaming big. Here are five questions to consider as your church seeks to make a bigger impact on your community and the world.

  1. Does your church possess a focused ministry toward discipleship results?

Technology is available to all today and simplicity is in. Because so many resources are readily available online, small churches can produce high-quality programming for worship, children, students, and small groups.

Larger churches are also deprogramming to streamline and narrow their ministry focus. The smaller church is simple by nature; the larger church is seeking to become simple by choice. Church ministry programming is more similar today than ever.

  1. Does your church have a leadership pipeline designed to raise up the next generation?

Creative use of bivocational or volunteer staff is expanding. In the past, bivocational ministry was relegated to small towns or small congregations. Today, more churches are strategically empowering and training a less expensive volunteer and bivocational work force. The typical church dedicates up to half of its income to personnel. Once facility and operational costs are taken into account, ministry resources are often less than ideal.

It’s important for churches to have adequate staff, but in this season, it’s equally important to train and equip many volunteers to serve in high-capacity leadership roles. When a church can devote 25-35 percent of its income to staff, leaving a greater share for ministry and community investment, the results are often exceptional. The identification and development of future leaders is a near-constant need.

  1. What committed partnerships does your ministry possess?

Trusted local and global partnerships are common. Smaller churches need the power and influence of outside organizations to have the opportunity for expanded impact. In the past, churches acted more independently, were less trusting of parachurch organizations, and were more loyal to their denomination.

Now, many of these walls are being broken down and cooperative partnerships across faith tribes are becoming the norm. Committed ministry partnerships allow a small congregation to experience a large impact both locally and globally. They also permit large churches to be more effective with their resources.

  1. Do you have a plan to reach more while building less?

Smaller buildings create more cash flow. One of the major contributors to limited financial resources is church debt. When congregations wisely under build in order to multiply services, tremendous amounts of resources are released for new ministries, staff positions, mission opportunities, and multisite development.

Ministry is more fun when you have more liquid resources. As land and building costs continue to increase, more efficient use of space and dollars will become the norm. Even large churches are learning how to multiply in smaller venues.

  1. How is your church making disciples according to its unique calling?

Uniqueness is being celebrated. Thirty years ago, almost every church looked alike. When it came to meeting times, styles, and programming, worship offerings were pretty much the same. As the church became more contemporary, only a few popular ministry models were adopted because few knew how to create a different kind of church.

Today, we have entered a time when leaders are dreaming biblically sound visions in fresh ways. These visions are being lived out down the street and around the world. Technology brings everything in real time and allows us to get there quickly.

Like never before, the eyes of church leaders are open to explore their unique God-given vision and calling. Success is now measured in disciple-making and community impact rather than building size or budgets.

There has never been a better time to lead a church. Large or small, urban or rural, local or dispersed, every church can make an impact locally and globally. How will the questions above challenge you to live small and dream big?

Read more from Todd.


Would you like to learn how to make a bigger impact in your community and the world? Connect with an Auxano Navigator and start a conversation with our team.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Todd McMichen

Todd McMichen has served for over 30 years in a variety of roles in the local church, doing everything from planting churches to lead pastor. While on staff he conducted two major capital campaigns helping to guide his local churches through sizable relocation projects. Those two churches alone raised over $35,000,000. Since 2000, Todd has been a well-established stewardship and generosity campaign coach, as well as a conference leader and speaker. Todd is a graduate of Palm Beach Atlantic College in West Palm Beach, FL and Southwestern Seminary in Ft. Worth, TX. He lives in Birmingham, AL with his wife Theresa, and their two kids, Riley and Breanna. You can contact Todd at todd@auxano.com or 205-223-7803.

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Sorry, the author of this content has removed the links at the original source!
 
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The hypertext link is broken for the pdf download - can it be fixed? Thanks!
 
— Steve Elliott
 
What happens when u dont have a meeting place any more. And u was forced out because the buliding wasnt available any more.
 
— Debra
 

Clarity Process

Three effective ways to start moving toward clarity right now.

5 Advantages of a True Leadership Pipeline

Leadership is a mixture of both poetry and plumbing, but unfortunately a lot more is written about the former than the later. The leadership systems and structure of a church are the major pieces of plumbing I am referring to today. For better or worse, they are defining factors in developing a leadership pipeline. Whether the church is small, mega, or multisite, it requires real work. Developing a leadership pipeline is not just reorganizing your org chart and implementing a clear training strategy. You are going to turn over some rocks and deal with whatever is underneath. Let’s look at systems then talk a bit about structure.

Systems are not ungodly. Your systems actually reveal your stewardship and how intentional you are with the people God has placed under your care. Systemization begins with auditing and documenting how you do what you do. Mapping out specific church processes and how they interact and overlap reveals more than you dreamed and maybe more than you feel comfortable exposing. These processes show what you truly value as a church and the gaps between your actual and aspirational values.

Take a look at your processes, forms, training,
 and so forth. In my previous church, I spearheaded the multisite ministry. By the time we launched our third campus, I had learned that if we didn’t have simple systems in place then we were headed for trouble. Nearly every time our pipeline got clogged and we had to take it apart to see what was wrong, the root cause was a systems issue.

Structure determines the working relationships between pastors, staff members, leaders, and volunteers as well as the relationships between peers at each level. Structure provides the foundation on which the systems and standard operating procedures rest. Analyze your church’s ministries. This analysis will determine what type of structure is best for your church. Study the dependency between different ministry areas.

Assess your church’s methods of communication. How your staff members and leaders communicate with
 each other is a key factor in aligning systems and processes. Regardless of how you decide
 to structure your leadership pipeline, alignment must exist across the organization. Some ministries will require more layers of leadership or more volunteers. However the levels, titles, and basic job descriptions should contain a common language.

This will be difficult for many of your people to handle. The upfront investment is time consuming, you are sure to uncover issues that need to be addressed, and the keepers of the status quo will be crying foul. However, if you persevere and walk your team through a full audit and realignment, you will be well on your way to creating a true leadership pipeline and the payoff brings you five key advantages:

  1. People identify their next steps.
  2. Provides systems clarity for development.
  3. Creates pathways for growth and development.
  4. Enables diagnosis of where and why your pipeline is clogged.
  5. Aligns language and positions across the organization.

In October, our team at LifeWay Leadership is hosting Pipeline, a conference to train church leadership teams how to develop and implement your own leadership pipeline. We want you and your team to join us. You can find out more and take advantage of the early bird registration discounts for you and your team at the website. Pipeline will be a rare opportunity to be trained by leading church practitioners and come away with an actual leadership development plan you can implement in your church.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Todd Adkins

Todd Adkins

Todd is Director of Leadership at LifeWay Christian Resources in Nashville, TN. He is host of the 5 Leadership Questions Podcast.

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Sorry, the author of this content has removed the links at the original source!
 
— VRcurator
 
The hypertext link is broken for the pdf download - can it be fixed? Thanks!
 
— Steve Elliott
 
What happens when u dont have a meeting place any more. And u was forced out because the buliding wasnt available any more.
 
— Debra
 

Clarity Process

Three effective ways to start moving toward clarity right now.

A 5-Part, Vision Centered Systems Model for Your Church

Over the past few years I have consulted with a number of fast growing churches to help them get unstuck.  Here’s what I’ve learned:

  • The church is a living organism designed to grow.
  • Growing churches grow.
  • Growing churches get stuck.
  • Growing churches are often one big decision from getting unstuck.
  • These big decisions are often predictable.

As a result of this work I’ve put together a little model that has help me in working with growing churches.  Represented in the model below are five areas to which every church, regardless of model or context, must pay attention.  Let me give you a brief overview.

DavidPutmanSystemsModel

 Vision

At the very center of this model is the Vision Frame developed by Will Mancini.  Pastors of growing churches do the hard work of vision. This work comes first and forms the vision frame of any growing church.  They recognize that God has given them a unique vision.  They understand this vision frame consists of five irreducible questions of clarity.  These questions include:

  •  What are we doing (mission)?
  • Why are we doing it (values)?
  • How are we doing it (strategy)?
  • When are we successful (measures)?
  • Where is God taking us (vision proper)?

These leaders understand that vision is more than a statement.  Best practices among visionaries are:

  • They have spent hours in prayer and scripture seeking God’s heart.
  • They have taken their team through a healthy process to discover God’s vision for their church.
  • They have crafted a culture, shaping language to articulate their unique vision with absolute clarity.
  • They value the “law of the outsider” and have consulted with someone who can help them navigate this unique journey.
  • They focus on implementing the vision frame over time.

Leaders who lack in vision ultimately end up getting stuck.

Leadership

Churches often get stuck when the churches growth outpaces that of the leadership.  This is why it is so important that we understand in order to grow the church, we must grow the leader.

There are five areas that every Senior Leader must grow.  They are:

  • Visioneer – Ability to discover, to communicate, and implement vision.
  • Communicator – Ability to communicate God’s word in a gospel-centered, passionate, and relevant way.
  • Team Leader – Ability to discern leadership, develop a leadership pipeline, develop new leaders, and execute ministry through others.
  • Funder of Mission – Ability to create a culture of generosity and raise capital for big endeavors.
  • Vitality – Ability to grow personally, emotionally, spiritually, intellectually, and professionally over the long haul.

Discipleship

As the church we have one and only one mission.  It’s a disciple-making mission.  Growing churches have a systematic process for accomplishing this mission. We often refer to this as disciple-making assimilation.  Disciple-making assimilation is different then church assimilation systems.  Church assimilation systems often focus on church membership.  Disciple-making assimilations systems focus on the quality and quantity of disciples.  It ultimately answers three questions:

  • What is a disciple?
  • How are disciples made in this context?
  • What are the measures of a disciple?

Environment

Space is important.  I wish it wasn’t.  It would make our work and lives much easier.  At the end of the day when a church runs out of space or has a poor environment it causes growth to slow and often time stop growing.  I often get inquires from new church planters wanting help for their lack of growth.  Many times it’s simply hindered by their meeting environment.

Many of our church buildings were built during a time when Christianity was the dominant worldview in the US.  That is no longer true.  We must become much more intentional about our environments if we are to reach people who begin their journey with their backs toward Christ and the church. Our partners at Visioneering Studios understand this.  I first encountered them at a conference during an Architectural Evangelism presentation.  We (Mountain Lake Church) were well into our design phase of a new worship space.  We were so convicted about the importance of space and environment that we ditched our project and began from scratch.  Growing churches that resolve the space and environment issues most often explode in growth.

A healthy practice is to utilize a Guest Service Perspective.  This service is designed to have a consultant who is trained in space and environment issues come in and do a kind of secret shopping experience in your church context.

Finances

A lack of funding is one of the best ways to kill a good idea.  The same is true for churches and ministry.  This is among the top two or three issues I deal with in helping fast-growing churches.  Vision most often out paces our resources.  Without exception, I watch young churches hit the financial huddle sooner or later in their ministry.

This happens due to a number of reasons.  They are:

  • Failure to disciple new and existing disciples in generosity.  Somewhere along the way we bought into the lie that people won’t come to your church if you talk about money.
  • No practical tools for teaching people how to get out of debt, budget, and give.  The number one tool for increasing a churches financial health over the long haul is a consistent financial ministry for the people, by the people.
  • Lack of healthy financial systems in the church.  Churches consistently spend inordinate percentages of their income on staffing and facility-related issues.  A balanced budget with appropriate checks and balances goes a long way.
  • Lack of communication about church finances.  People often feel in the dark when it comes to church finances.  We ask them for their money, but we refuse to tell them how God is using it.
  • Failure to conduct discipleship-oriented capital campaigns.  Churches make two common mistakes when it comes to raising capital for specific needs.  First, they often fail to hire an outside consultant.  Research consistently demonstrates that a consultant makes a huge difference when it comes to a campaign.  Secondly, they conduct a poorly executed campaign.  When conducting a campaign you must go all in.  A well-done campaign can compel a church into the future, enabling you to overcome the barriers that come along with lack of funding.

As a part of the Auxano Team we are eager to serve you and your church as you deal with those natural barriers of a growing church.  Don’t hesitate to contact us.  We offer a number of on-site consulting services.  They include: Vision Pathway, Resourcing, Leadership Pipeline, Communications, and StratOps.

Read more from David here.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

David Putman

David Putman

David is a Lead Navigator serving on the Auxano Team, the category leader in vision clarity and vision focus campaigns. He is also founder leader of Planting the Gospel a non-profit ministry committed to helping churches move discipleship from a program to a culture. He has been involved in church planting for over twenty years as a planter, strategist, and coach. He is author of I Woke Up In Heaven, The Gospel Disciple, Detox for the Overly Religious, Breaking the Discipleship Code, and co-author of Breaking the Missional Code with Ed Stetzer. He latest book The Gospel Disciple Journey will be released in February 2014. David’s life mission is to help others discover the simplicity, centrality, and beauty of Jesus and his ways. David is married to Tami and they have two awesome kids, and two even more awesome grandkids.

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Recent Comments
Sorry, the author of this content has removed the links at the original source!
 
— VRcurator
 
The hypertext link is broken for the pdf download - can it be fixed? Thanks!
 
— Steve Elliott
 
What happens when u dont have a meeting place any more. And u was forced out because the buliding wasnt available any more.
 
— Debra
 

Clarity Process

Three effective ways to start moving toward clarity right now.