The Vision Veil

When Moses came down from Mount Sinai with the tablets (the 2nd time around), his face was lit up with the glory of God. His countenance was so radiant that he had to cover his face with a veil. The people couldn’t handle the level of God’s presence that Moses had experienced. A full disclosure of the revelation would have blown them away.

Sometimes you’ll have an encounter with God that’s so intense you can’t reveal it to everyone in your life. I’m not talking about some spooky out of body shake and quake bark like a dog fall into a trance encounter with God. This has very practical implications.

When you make a commitment to live for Christ with greater commitment, people who know you really well may doubt your sincerity or ability to change. Even the disciples were freaked out by the possibility of assimilating Paul-their former persecutor-into their posse.

Sometimes God plants a vision in your heart so outrageous that you need to keep it to yourself for a while. Joseph would have done well to internalize his dream instead of giving his brothers ammunition to launch against him.

Sometimes God speaks to you in the form of an impression that your human vocabulary can’t communicate-even to the people closest to you. When Mary realized the child inside of her was the very Son of God, she treasured the truth in her heart. She couldn’t declare it with her mouth yet. This was between her and God-for now.

Be aware that in life and leadership, sometimes you’ll feel out of place when you come down from the mountain after meeting with God. It may take time for the people surrounding you to get adjusted to the new reality. Sometimes you’ll have to cover your vision with a veil until what you’ve seen becomes clear to others too. Don’t take it as an insult. Don’t question the validity of your revelation.

Just thank God that your vision is too luminous for human eyes to behold.

It’s a sign of a very bright future.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Steven Furtick

Steven Furtick

Pastor Steven Furtick is the lead pastor of Elevation Church. He and his wife, Holly, founded Elevation in 2006 with seven other families. Pastor Steven holds a Master of Divinity degree from The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is also the New York Times Best Selling author of Crash the Chatterbox, Greater, and Sun Stand Still. Pastor Steven and Holly live in the Charlotte area with their two sons, Elijah and Graham, and daughter, Abbey.

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In this era, we have the opportunity of professional church staff today who utilize their gifting to shape the image and atmosphere of the church organization. But the 100% real impact on the church visitors is genuine evidence of changed lives by the gospel and the active growing discipleship (just as it was in the first century church). One demonstration is financially rich believers ministering equally together with poor believers (how odd, and incredibly miraculous; all humble and bow at the foot of the cross.). It is the awesome contrast of church members vocations, race, gender, age, maturity, gifting, humility that demonstrates to visitors "there is a Spirit in the place". That first-time guest list of 10 are "physical excuses", not spiritual excuses. Those don't tell the story. The condition of facilities and publicly greeting people have zero to do with it. The power of God in and through believers lives dedicated to impact other people with their relationship bridge-building of acceptance of the lost around them. Empowered believers are infectious, loving, helpful, giving, self-less, dynamic, compelling, bold, Christ-filled. As I have been in many church settings domestically and internationally, the facilities can be poor, and yet the fellowship can still be rich. We need to operate with first church humility. People come to Christ on His terms, not on our human abilities of hospitality. A huge catastrophe in a community, disaster relief brings lots of people into churches – many come to the church in those terrible conditions no matter the physical condition of the local church. Off the condition of facility, and onto the condition of God's people (living stones).... and everything else will grow.... and the other physical issues will be corrected by the staff.
 
— Russ Wright
 
"While I understand the intent behind this phrase" Expound please. What do you understand to be the intent behind that phrase?
 
— Ken
 
Thank you for this article! I'm the pastor of a small church. My gifting is in teaching and we are known for aiding Christians in becoming Biblically literate. Visitor's often comment on God's presence being very real in our services. But we just don't seem to be growing. I have some soul-searching, etc. to do and this article provides some solid ground from which to proceed. Thank you again.
 
— Jonathan Schultheis
 

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