How to Thrive in Today’s Culture of Haste

One of the great frustrations in organizations are leaders whoose enthusiasm to make a project happen overrides their patience. Great things take time, and it doesn’t help to push your team to the point of damaging the outcome. In government, this administration has trouble with haste. Remember Nancy Pelosi who lectured Congress to pass Obamacare, and THEN we’ll see what’s in the bill. Now, HHS secretary Kathleen Sebelius is taking heat for the Obamacare website that was rushed to completion before it could be tested and proven.

When writing my book “Jolt: Get The Jump on a World That’s Constantly Changing,” I realized that today, we live in a culture of haste. Every new web browser update has to be faster, new laptops must have ever faster processors, and delivery dates are moved up – even if the software or product needs multiple fixes after it’s released.

I’m a big fan of innovation and progress, but I wonder if that sense of haste has invaded our personal relationships. I see it taking it toll on our friendships, spiritual life, and fulfillment. (When was the last time you had lunch with a friend that wasn’t distracted by your mobile device?) We think every email, text, or phone message has to be returned now.

In government, business, and nonprofit work, speed is good, but great execution is better. Slow down, focus on quality, not speed. Give your team the time to make it work, and work right. Make sure your deadlines are realistic.

Don’t undermine your vision because you don’t have the patience for excellence.

When was the last time your team was pushed to the point your project failed?

Read more from Phil here.

Download PDF

Tags: , ,

| What is MyVisionRoom? > | Back to Leadership >

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Phil Cooke

See more articles by >

COMMENTS

What say you? Leave a comment!

Recent Comments
Yea! You fixed it!
 
— Mr. Troy Reynolds
 
I just discovered this today and am looking forward to exploring the content on here. It looks like it could be very helpful. Just an FYI - in your paragraph on not putting out B+ material you have a typo. A little ironic. :-) The third sentence begins with "You time" not "Your time."
 
— Troy Reynolds
 
I'm lost, to say the least! As a new pastor, taking over a newly started church I have read just about everything there is to learn what I can do to grow the church. I truly beleive that those attending our church are friendly and sincere. So that can't be the issue. I have read all the comments to this article and I feel that most churches will never have a fair chance! We are a VERY small church, so we don't have a children's church (yet). So if a family comes and gets upset that we don't have a children's church for them to put their children into, we lose! We do provide things for their kids to do during the service and even have an option for their kids to be in a different room, if they don't want their kids to sit with them. We are also such a small church that we don't have a worship team/band/etc. Our worship music comes from music videos. The congregation we do have likes it this way, but of course we would love to have a worhsip team. So, if someone comes to our church and is upset that we don't have live music, we lose! The point I am trying to make is that when people come in with preconceived ideas of what a church should be like, they will never find a church home, unless they find a church who's goal is to entertain! Every Sunday our message comes from the Bible, so that can't be a complaint for someone, so instead, people leave the church and never come back because they want more from a church: they don't want friendly people who are following the Word of God; they want a church that give them something (a babysitter for their kid, entertainment, free gifts, etc.) I'm sorry if sound cynical, I truly want everyone to hear the Good News and learn about Christ's love, but if they come in looking for something else, then the church will always lose!
 
— JAG
 

Clarity Process

Three effective ways to start moving toward clarity right now.