How to Thrive in Today’s Culture of Haste

One of the great frustrations in organizations are leaders whoose enthusiasm to make a project happen overrides their patience. Great things take time, and it doesn’t help to push your team to the point of damaging the outcome. In government, this administration has trouble with haste. Remember Nancy Pelosi who lectured Congress to pass Obamacare, and THEN we’ll see what’s in the bill. Now, HHS secretary Kathleen Sebelius is taking heat for the Obamacare website that was rushed to completion before it could be tested and proven.

When writing my book “Jolt: Get The Jump on a World That’s Constantly Changing,” I realized that today, we live in a culture of haste. Every new web browser update has to be faster, new laptops must have ever faster processors, and delivery dates are moved up – even if the software or product needs multiple fixes after it’s released.

I’m a big fan of innovation and progress, but I wonder if that sense of haste has invaded our personal relationships. I see it taking it toll on our friendships, spiritual life, and fulfillment. (When was the last time you had lunch with a friend that wasn’t distracted by your mobile device?) We think every email, text, or phone message has to be returned now.

In government, business, and nonprofit work, speed is good, but great execution is better. Slow down, focus on quality, not speed. Give your team the time to make it work, and work right. Make sure your deadlines are realistic.

Don’t undermine your vision because you don’t have the patience for excellence.

When was the last time your team was pushed to the point your project failed?

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Phil Cooke

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Recent Comments
If someone wants entertainment they're going to the wrong place. Church is not a place for entertainment...or in my opinion a barrage of coffee and donuts. Why are churches today bringing the world INTO them? Then there's the thing with children...age appropriate??? These little guys can pick stuff up in service. Besides Jesus said Suffer little children, and forbid them not, to come unto me: for of such is the kingdom of heaven. Mt. 19:14.
 
— Laurie
 
I love the intentionality here as well as the challenge to look at the data. That's missing so many times. I would like to offer a contrarian's take. Church members and regular attenders have so many ways to get information: Announcements, bulletins, social channels, relationships, and email being among the options. But brand new people are likely going to check out the website and that's it. It might be wiser for churches with limited time and resources to focus their website almost exclusively to guests. This group of people isn't looking for a calendar of events but wants to know about regular programs. They probably aren't interested in watching all of the messages but instead may want to preview one of the services. For the times we need church members to go to websites (sign up for camp, join a group, etc), we're probably better off designing and promoting a specific page rather than cluttering up the homepage.
 
— Michael Lukaszewski (@mlukaszewski)
 
A great question! Unfortunately, the Church Unique Kit is no longer available in print form. We are working on revising it and updating it into an online experience, but that project is at least six months out. An alternative is to come to an upcoming certification class. There is one May 15-18 in Houston, and October 23-26 in Atlanta.
 
— VRcurator
 

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